ongoing studies

 

Sleeping Twins: The Genetics of Sleep and Cortical Development in Adolescence

Adolescence is a critical period in development, characterised by rapid biological, cognitive, emotional and social changes.  Interacting with these processes, is sleep, which is also in flux during this period.  Given the importance of sleep during this developmental period, the aim of this proposal is to unravel the genetic and environmental contributions to sleep, brain development, and cognition using a twin study. We will use two longitudinal assessments (six months apart) of sleep (sleep EEG) and brain structure (MRI) in 12-to-14-year-olds monozygotic and dizygotic twins to achieve the following specific aims: 1) Quantify the degree to which concurrent changes in brain structure, cognition, and sleep physiology observed during adolescence are due to common or unique genetic and environmental factors. 2) Quantify the heritability of sleep at two longitudinal time points six months apart. 3) Examine whether sleep duration in the intervening year between assessments shows high heritability and is predictive of the changes in sleep and brain structure/cognition. This proposal uses an integrative approach to elucidate genetic and environmental influences on sleep and brain development during adolescence. 

Measures: Sleep EEG, MRI, MRS, Cognitive Function, Depressive Symptoms, Actigraphy

 

 

 

 

 
NREM and REM spectra of a pair of identical (Monozygotic) twins

NREM and REM spectra of a pair of identical (Monozygotic) twins

NREM and REM spectra of a pair of fraternal (Dizygotic) twins

NREM and REM spectra of a pair of fraternal (Dizygotic) twins